Lizard fish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 Scapa Flow

UK, Scotland, Orkney Isles

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

English (Translate this text in English): Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdom's chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars.

It contains some of the most interesting wrecks in the world.

On June 21, 1919, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, after waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. Fifty-one ships sank.

Some of them remain and provide excellent wrecks for interested sports divers:

- Battlecruisers: SMS Hindenburg, SMS Derfflinger, SMS Seydlitz, SMS Moltke and SMS Von der Tann.

- Cruisers: SMS Cöln II, SMS Karlsruhe II, SMS Dresden II, SMS Brummer and SMS Bremse. SMS Nürnberg II, SMS Frankfurt and SMS Emden II were beached.

Enjoy Scapa Flow shipwrecks!

More details

 
Seasons
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Climate                        
Air temp.                        
Water temp.                        
Equipment
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Dive sites

Dive sites (12)
Quality Avg depth Max depth Experience Dive type
F2 & Barge - / -
15.0 m 17.0 m All divers
Gobernador Bories - / -
15.0 m 17.0 m CMAS * / OW
James Barrie - / -
38.0 m 42.0 m CMAS *** / Rescue
SMS Brummer - / -
25.0 m 33.0 m CMAS ** / AOW
SMS Cöln - / 1
25.0 m 36.0 m CMAS ** / AOW
SMS Dresden 2 / 1
25.0 m 36.0 m CMAS ** / AOW
SMS Karlsruhe 3 / -
20.0 m 26.0 m CMAS ** / AOW
SMS König - / -
25.0 m 40.0 m CMAS *** / Rescue
SMS Kronprinz Wilhelm 3 / -
25.0 m 37.0 m CMAS ** / AOW
SMS Markgraf - / -
30.0 m 43.0 m CMAS *** / Rescue
Tabarka 2 / -
15.0 m 15.0 m CMAS * / OW
V 83 Destroyer - / -
15.0 m 18.0 m CMAS * / OW
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 Photos

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SMS Dresden
United Kingdom

SMS Dresden
United Kingdom

SMS Karlsruhe
United Kingdom

SMS Karlsruhe
United Kingdom

 Videos

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 Dive logs

Show all (4)...

markcra avatar
SMS Markgraf
De markcra
Out 7, 2008
- Missed the previous days diving as I couldn't clear my ears. Flew down the shot line to meet the rudders of the Markgraf. Battleship lies upside-down, proceeded along sea bed on starboard side stopping to view casement guns (5.9" bore
Mais...
markcra avatar
SMS Cöln
De markcra
Out 5, 2008
- Watched as a school of fish passed over the deck and onto the hull. Spotted a lobter that had made himself comfortable in the deck of the wreck. Visibility was good. Nitrox 32% Buddy: William
Mais...
markcra avatar
SMS Brummer
De markcra
Out 5, 2008
My first Scapa Wreck - Vis was great, 28m and at 11degC it wasn't too cold. The shot line hit the midship of the wreck, we followed the deck to the bow and returned via the hull. Passed a few of the big guns and looking into the turret at the base of a gun barrel I f
Mais...

SMS Brummer
De Scubatigger
Abr 22, 2001
Bremma -
Mais...

 Dive trips

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markcra avatar
Viagem: Scapa Flow 2008
De markcra
Do Out 4, 2008 ao Out 10, 2008
A week aboard the Sunrise, diving the scuttled German High Seas Fleet. This was my first experience of a live-aboard and although it looked a little small the boat served us well. With the exception of one failed attempt to drop onto the Taba
Mais...

Viagem: Aquabash 2001
De Scubatigger
Do Abr 22, 2001 ao Abr 27, 2001

Mais...

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