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 USAT Meigs

Australia, NT, Darwin

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Exact

GPS History (2)

Latitude: 12° 29.6' S
Longitude: 130° 49.033' E

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English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

Darwin Harbour

English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

English (Translate this text in English): Darwin Harbour

How? By boat

Distance Good boat time (< 30min)

Easy to find? Don't know

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name USS Meigs (incorrect naming)

Average depth 17 m / 55.8 ft

Max depth 18 m / 59.1 ft

Current Low ( < 1 knot)

Visibility Low ( < 5 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Standard

Experience CMAS * / OW

Bio interest Poor

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Wreck

Dive site activities

- Marine biology
- Dive training

Dangers

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

"The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): "The USAT Meigs, a United States Army transport vessel (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the USS Meigs), was sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air raid against the Australia mainland on February 19, 1942.

Built San Pedro, California, in 1921 as the West Lewart, the Meigs had a steel hull, measured 12,568 Gross Tons (also cited as 11358 tons), 430.7 feet (140m) long, 54.3 feet (16m) beam and 26.2 feet draft. As the largest vessel in Darwin Harbour she was frequently under air attack, and went down in flames after being struck by incendiary bombs and aerial torpedoes. Two of its crew of sixty-six were killed.

Although the superstructure of the wreck was salvaged after the war by Fujita Salvage of Osaka, Japan, the cargo of munitions, railway lines, Bren gun carriers and trucks intended for Allied forces in Portuguese Timor remains. The Meigs is now a dive site, where the remnants of the cargo are as visible as the remains of the vessel itself. It lies in 26m of water, and due to the large tidal movements creating strong currents and poor visibility, is only divable around neap tides."

Description source: Wikipedia.org

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