Lizard fish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 Pope's Eye

Australia, VIC, Melbourne

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Approximate

GPS History (1)

Latitude: 38° 16.594' S
Longitude: 144° 41.911' E

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English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

English (Translate this text in English): Southern end of Port Phillip Bay. Four kilometres from the Heads between Portsea and Queenscliff

How? By boat

Distance Short boat time (< 10min)

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name Popes Eye

Average depth 8 m / 26.2 ft

Max depth 12 m / 39.4 ft

Current 

Visibility 

Quality

Dive site quality Standard

Experience All divers

Bio interest Interesting

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Reef

Dive site activities

- Marine biology
- Dive training
- Photography

Dangers

- Boat trafic

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

English (Translate this text in English): The Pope's Eye is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip Bay in the state of Victoria, Australia. It has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 km inside Port Phillip Heads, 3 km east of Queenscliff and 5 km north of Portsea. It is named after a naval midshipman and has no religious connotations.

Construction of the Pope’s Eye began in the 1880s, under the supervision of Sir William Jervoise, by dumping bluestone boulders on a submerged (12 m deep) sandbank until they formed a horse-shoe shaped artificial reef, open to the north-east, just above high-water level. Construction ceased before completion as a fort because improvements in naval gunnery enabled the entrance to Port Phillip (The Rip) and the associated shipping channel to be protected by guns at the nearby Swan Island fort, as well as at Fort Queenscliff and Point Nepean, making the Pope’s Eye redundant for military purposes. The reef now now hosts a navigation beacon.

The inside of the ‘eye’ is only about 2 m deep and is accessible to small boats as a sheltered anchorage. It is protected from strong currents and the whole structure is popular with snorkellers and scuba-divers.

The reef provides a rich habitat based on the underwater forest of marine algae, such as Giant Kelp and Leathery Kelp, that sustains a rich fauna of fish and marine invertebrates, including sponges and soft corals. The Pope’s Eye is an important breeding site for Australasian Gannets, which breed on platforms constructed for them as well as on the rocks of the reef. The site is often visited by Australian Fur Seals and Bottlenose Dolphins.

Source: Wikipedia

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Pope's Eye
Di Ghostcopy
feb 15, 2009
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