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 Abrolhos Islands Archipelago

Australia, WA

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

English (Translate this text in English): The Houtman Abrolhos (often informally called the Abrolhos Islands) is a chain of 122 islands, and associated coral reefs, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Australia. Nominally located at 28°43′S 113°47′E; it lies about eighty kilometres (50 mi) west of Geraldton, Western Australia.

It is the southernmost true coral reef in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reef systems in the world. It is one of the world's most important seabird breeding sites, and is the centre of Western Australia's largest single species fishery, the Western Rock Lobster fishery.

It has a small seasonal population of fishermen, and a limited number of tourists are permitted for day trips, but most of the land area is off limits as conservation habitat. It is well known as the site of numerous shipwrecks, the most famous being the Dutch ships Batavia, which was wrecked in 1629, and Zeewijk, wrecked in 1727. Source: Wikipedia.org

This is a string of coral islands off the Geraldton coast. It is one of the most southerly coral reefs and a hub for crayfish fisheries. No doubt there are many individual dive sites here - please elaborate if you have dived here.

More details

 
Seasons
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Climate                        
Air temp.                        
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Equipment No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé No sé
Best season

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Dive sites

Dive sites (4)
Quality Avg depth Max depth Experience Dive type
Batavia Shipwreck - / -
6 m 6 m All divers
Morning reef - / -
6 m 10 m All divers
North Island - / -
8 m 20 m CMAS * / OW
Zeewijk Shipwreck - / -
5 m 8 m CMAS * / OW

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