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 F69

New Zealand, NI, Wellington

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Exact

GPS History (1)

Latitude: 41° 21.45' S
Longitude: 174° 47.283' E

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 Access

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

English (Translate this text in English): This dive site is only 5 minutes from the cities airport. Located off the south coast is lies les than 1 kilometers off shore and is probably the most accessible divewreck on the planet.

Stern of vessel F69 will be at approx GPS point +41deg 21.270S • 174 deg 46.770E

How? By boat

Distance Short boat time (< 10min)

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name HMNZS Wellington

Average depth 12.0 m / 39.4 ft

Max depth 28.0 m / 91.9 ft

Current Low ( < 1 knot)

Visibility Medium ( 5 - 10 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Great

Experience All divers

Bio interest Don't know

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Wreck

Dive site activities

- Marine biology
- Photography

Dangers

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

English (Translate this text in English): The country's newest shipwreck and dive attraction is already covered in algae and home to a myriad of sea life. The former Leander-class Navy frigate HMNZS Wellington was sunk off Island Bay in Wellington on November 13 after six years of planning and preparation.

The top of the bridge and the ship's helicopter hangar was only six metres below the surface at low tide and could be dived on by snorkellers. Mr Zeeman said divers with air tanks had said the internal dive on the ship could be done without a torch because there were so many holes cut in the ship which let in a lot of light. The ship had already attracted a lot of sealife, with schools of red cod and juvenile fish.

The ship sank in less than two minutes after a huge fireball exploded over the bridge and bow of the ship, and carefully placed explosive charges blew out precut holes in the hull, shown in the above right image. The ship was built in England in 1969 for the Royal Navy and named HMS Bacchante. It was bought by the New Zealand Government in 1981 and renamed HMNZS Wellington.

 Photos

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F69
New Zealand

F69
New Zealand

F69
New Zealand

F69
New Zealand

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 Comments

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By Anonymous , 20-11-2006

Frigate Wellington - Had a dive with dolphins around the bridge of F69....wow...dive of a lifetime!!! This shipwreck rocks!!

By Anonymous , 17-08-2006

Incredible diving!! - Yes this is one amazing dive...witness the power of the sea and see a 3 piece warship post a 13m storm..this also has to be one of the fasting growing artificial reefs on the planet. for more info see
www.divewreck.co.nz

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